Coyote Hunting in North Carolina [Rules & Regulations 2023-2024]

North Carolina is a state rich with outdoor activities, especially for hunting. Coyote hunting is one of the most popular types of hunting in the state, due to its plentiful population and attractive trophy potential. Whether you’re a novice or an experienced hunter, this guide has everything you need to know about coyote hunting in North Carolina;

From laws and regulations to tips and tricks, you’ll be well-prepared for your next outing!

Coyote Hunting Laws in Laws in North Carolina

In North Carolina, there is no closed season for coyote hunting. You can hunt them year-round with no bag limits.

The only exception to this is on game lands, where the taking of coyotes is only allowed during daylight hours from the first Saturday in September through the last day of February.

Read Coyote Hunting Laws in North Carolina

Coyotes may be taken with firearms, dogs, and electronic calls. The use of bait is currently prohibited.

When using dogs to hunt coyotes, you must have a minimum of two dogs and they must be under your direct control at all times. You are also required to wear hunter orange when using dogs for hunting coyotes on game lands during deer season.

It is illegal to shoot a firearm from a moving vehicle on any public road or right-of-way in North Carolina. This includes shooting at coyotes that are crossing roads.

Do you need a license to hunt coyotes in North Carolina?

In North Carolina, you do not need a license to hunt coyotes. However, there are some regulations that you must follow in order to hunt coyotes legally.

For example, you must have a valid hunting license if you plan to use a firearm to hunt coyotes.

Additionally, you can only hunt on private property with the landowner’s permission. If you plan to trap or snare coyotes, you must obtain a trapping license from the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission.

Coyote Hunting Seasons in North Carolina

Coyotes can be hunted year-round in North Carolina with no bag limit. Night hunting for coyotes is allowed with a valid hunting license and a permit from the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission.

A brief overview of coyote hunting seasons in North Carolina is provided below.

  • Spring: Spring coyote hunting season runs from March 15-May 31. Night hunting is allowed during this time period.
  • Summer: Summer coyote hunting season runs from June 1-July 31. Night hunting is not allowed during this time period.
  • Fall: Fall coyote hunting season runs from August 1-February 28 (the following year). Night hunting is allowed during this time period.
  • Winter: Winter coyote hunting season runs from December 1-February 28 (the following year). Night hunting is allowed during this time period.

Can you hunt coyotes at night in North Carolina?

In North Carolina, coyote hunting is only allowed during daylight hours. This is because coyotes are considered a fur-bearing animal, and it is illegal to hunt them at night.

However, there are some exceptions to this rule. If you are on private property and have permission from the landowner, you can hunt coyotes at night. You also need to be properly licensed and have a valid hunting permit.

Bag limits for hunting Coyote in North Carolina

In North Carolina, the bag limit for hunting coyotes is two per day. There is no season limit on how many coyotes you can take in a year. The only restriction is that you must possess a valid hunting license.

A properly licensed hunter may use any legal weapon to hunt coyotes, including but not limited to: firearms, air guns, bow and arrows, and knives.

Where to hunt Coyotes in North Carolina?

North Carolina offers expanding coyote hunting opportunities as populations increase statewide across a habitat mix of forests, farms and swamplands. Decent public land access exists on several game lands and national forests holding growing coyote numbers.

The western half of the state contains excellent terrain for hunting coyotes as they spread into new areas. Certain counties have seen particular expansion opportunities, with increasing sightings on game lands like Cold Mountain and Pisgah National Forest. Opportunistic hunting on private lands with permission can also produce results.

In eastern North Carolina, game lands like Holly Shelter, Angola Bay and Croatan maintain habitat suitable for coyotes as they colonize more parts of the state. Large public areas like Camp Lejeune Marine base also host coyote populations that can be targeted when seasonal access permits.

Legal ways to hunt Coyote in North Carolina

In North Carolina, there are two ways to legally hunt coyotes: with a hunting license or with a trapping license. If you have a hunting license, you can hunt coyotes on public land during the open season.

You can also hunt coyotes on private land with permission from the landowner. If you have a trapping license, you can trap coyotes on public and private land with permission from the landowner.

To get a hunting or trapping license, you must be at least 16 years old and have completed a hunter education course. For more information on how to get a hunting or trapping license in North Carolina, visit the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission website.

Can you use dogs to hunt coyotes in North Carolina?

Yes, dogs can be used to hunt coyotes in North Carolina. There are several methods that can be used, including using hounds to tree or chase the coyote, or using GPS collars to track the animal. Dogs can also be trained to track and locate coyote dens.

Can you hunt coyotes from a vehicle in North Carolina?

Yes, you can hunt coyotes from a vehicle in North Carolina. However, there are some restrictions on how close you can be to the road and how many people can be in the vehicle. Additionally, you must have a valid hunting license and follow all other hunting regulations.

Final Thoughts

As you can see, there is a lot to consider when coyote hunting in North Carolina. By following the tips and guidelines in this article, you will be well on your way to becoming a successful coyote hunter.

Remember to always respect the animal and the land that you are hunting on, and be sure to check with local game laws before heading out. With a little preparation and practice, you will be able to enjoy this challenging and rewarding sport.

Important Notice: The articles published on this website are only for informational purposes and we do not promote hunting/ killing animals. If you are willing to hunt please refer to Authorized sources for correct and updated information. Writer/ Website owner will not be responsible for any consequences due to information provided on this website. You can refer to relevant Government sources for updated information.

Leave a Comment

x